Wind Thru A, C Vent

Properties

Rating 3.5 Stars with 1,221 ratings
Released almost 6 years ago
Size 1.45 MiB

(short preview of full seamless looping track)

(short preview of full seamless looping track)

Wind Thru A, C Vent

The sound of streaming air is like a desert storm raging through some small outpost as tents and wet clothes hanging on the line flap violently in the sandy wind. This little metal channel, funneling cold are into your home, creating comfort and calm where burning feet and sweating backs would normally be, is a lifeline for your entire desert dwelling family. The concept of air conditioning is known to have been applied in Ancient Rome, where aqueduct water was circulated through the walls of certain houses to cool them down. Other techniques in medieval Persia involved the use of cisterns and wind towers to cool buildings during the hot season. Modern air conditioning emerged from advances in chemistry during the 19th century, and the first large-scale electrical air conditioning was invented and used in 1902 by Willis Haviland Carrier. The 2nd-century Chinese inventor Ding Huane of the Han Dynasty invented a rotary fan for air conditioning, with seven wheels 3 m (9.8 ft) in diameter and manually powered. In 1758, Benjamin Franklin and John Hadley, a chemistry professor at Cambridge University, conducted an experiment to explore the principle of evaporation as a means to rapidly cool an object. Franklin and Hadley confirmed that evaporation of highly volatile liquids such as alcohol and ether could be used to drive down the temperature of an object past the freezing point of water. They conducted their experiment with the bulb of a mercury thermometer as their object and with a bellows used to "quicken" the evaporation; they lowered the temperature of the thermometer bulb down to 7°F while the ambient temperature was 65°F. Franklin noted that soon after they passed the freezing point of water (32°F) a thin film of ice formed on the surface of the thermometer's bulb and that the ice mass was about a quarter inch thick when they stopped the experiment upon reaching 7°F. Franklin concluded, "From this experiment, one may see the possibility of freezing a man to death on a warm summer's day".
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